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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
our colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by margaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate night headquarters in chicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign in terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to you about casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on having people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
, nancy. jan crawford has been covering the romney campaign. she is in boston tonight. jan? >> well, scott, governor romney just landed here about an hour ago after making campaign stops in that key state of ohio and in pennsylvania. he talked to reporters on the way back on the plane and he said he felt good about this campaign. they hadn't left anything in the locker room and that he thinks they're going to win. he said he just finished his victory speech. he's not written a concession speech. now, the mood inside the campaign tonight, scott, is one of cautious optimism, i'd say. but there is a little bit of nervousness and here's why: campaign sources that i'm talking with tonight say they are encouraged by the high numbers of republican turnout they're seeing in these swing states like ohio, florida, virginia. they believe that will outperform john mccain in 2008. that's the key to this election. they really had to run up the score in those areas. but here's where the nervousness comes in. they're also seeing some of the president's turnout in some of those democratic areas like in nor
roberts was there in boston again today with a recap, john? >> the governor put on a brave face. but he was experiencing bitter disappointment and a long, long road to get where he was. it does go to show that the were accurate in what they were hoying and always happens in every four years. they were looking attractive in closing days, they really weren't. the real question it. broadly divided as the country is and big issues facing us, is this a recipe for grid lock or will it spark dipartisan legislation. mitt romney said he would reach across the aisle and he asked those in charge next year to get something done. >> the nation as you know is at a criticical point we can't risk political bickers and partisanship. we have storeach across the aisle. we look to teachers and professors and county on you to teach and inspire our children with passion and discovery. >> the president pledged to meet with mitt romney to talk about the problems . if the republican party hopes to win back the white house it has work to do. governor romney lost among women and lost the hispanic vote. president
to boston to watch the returns in a speech to supporters. we have been speaking to reporters the last couple of days here at c-span, finding out what they think is going to happen on election night. >> we're going to see a pretty consistent pattern across the country. it will start in virginia where the polls closed at 7:00 p.m. burgeon as a contested battleground state. a relatively tight race. the bottom line, it will be a close race. they're good at counting votes and we have a pretty good senate race. if we know that virginia is leaning one way or another, or toward one of the senate candidate, we're going to have a pretty good idea of what the rest of the night is good to look for. keep an eye on virginia. that is an early bellwether, canary in the coal mine for what is coming the rest of the night. in a macro sense what i am looking at is -- what we will see on november 6 is the first normal data point we have seen in eight years. we have not seen what a normal life threat looks like since george of the bush was running for reelection. we will watch how many non-white voter turnout. is
are in boston. he will also campaign in ohio and pennsylvania, a state that hasn't voted for a republican presidential nominee since george bush senior, back in '88. what does that tell you? is that a hail mary backup in case he loses ohio or just worth a try since he's in the neighborhood or does he think he really has a chance? >> it depends on who you ask, anderson. clearly the polls have tightened up in pennsylvania. they took a look at it, when you talk to the folks in the romney campaign they say listen, we have spent the money, we need to spend in all these battleground states that john was talking about. all of our resources that we can put in there are there. we are up on the air as much as we can be. there's no more room for ads on tv in all these battleground states and they took a look at pennsylvania and said first of all, it's right next door to ohio so not like they have to go across the country to go there. plus more than 90% of pennsylvanians will vote on election day. there's no early voting in pennsylvania. absentees, you have to meet a certain criteria so the vast majo
in chicago. governor romney in boston. we'll take you there live in a moment. we are getting information on why they vote the way they are. martha maccallum will cover that for us. >> reporter: they are analyzing the response as they come out of the polling places tonight. there are key states like ohio and virginia. the polls are still open for hours as people come home from work and continue to vote. so many areas we haven't heard from yet. what we can tell you for sure so far is that this is a very tight race tonight. let's start with the national poll question. direction of the country. are we on the right track or the wrong track? it's evenly divided. those saying we are on the right direction and going for president obama, no surprise there. 52%, though, say we are headed in the wrong direction. they are backing governor romney. now voters are split on whether the economy is getting better or worse. huge question tonight for everyone, of course. you have about four out of ten states getting better. three of ten say it's getting worse. three of ten says it stays the same for them. s
a bounty for indian scalps, went back, scalped them, and went to boston where she was a hero in. they erected a statue to her, the first statue of a woman showed her with a hatchet in one hand and scalp l in the other. >> kenneth davis, taking your questions, and the most recent, "don't know much about american presidents," watch live on booktv on c-span2. >> just a few minutes ago, i called vice president bush and congratlated him on his victory. i know i speak to you that he'll be our president, and we'll work with him. this nation faces major challenges ahead, and we must work together. >> i've just received a telephone call from governor decaucus. [cheers and applause] i want you to know that he was most gracious. his call was personal. it was genuinely friendly, and it was great tradition of american politics. .. >> if you're a registered voter, you have a choice to make this year. among three candidates on election day. the polls are accurate, every vote will matter. this race is considered a tossup too close to call. if you are undecided tonight come in the next hour may
in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
before a crowd of his own supporters, that were gathered outside his campaign headquarters in boston. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory, his supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. i wish all of them well. but particularly the president, the first lady and their daughters. this is a time of great challenges for america. and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threat
correspondent is at governor romney's headquarters in boston. let's begin with you. >> they're excited, optimistic anxious and awaiting the result. it's an open question as to one might know until 1:00 a.m. or future days. the romney campaign is watching closely florida, virginia and ohio. there are very few victory strategies contemplated by boston, the romney campaign, that don't include the buckeye state and they're concerned about signs of high turn-out in the northern part of ohio where the detroit auto bail-out was a big mallet which the president pounded mr. romney. on the southern border of ohio along kentucky, particularly along cincinnati, hamilton county, big optimism and turn-out for the republican campaign. virginia, florida, ohio romney believes so go though so goes the country. romney has only written one speech, a victory speech. >> carl cameron. let's get straight to the president's camp in chicago and ed henry. >> shep, the president has been getting very wistful. it started in iowa what started the obama movement. he said today he was crying partly because it was col
and a columnist with "the boston herald", and julie roginsky, former political adviser to frank lautenberg and a fox news contributor. so the washington times comes out with an editorial that says he has no mandate. they say that he is, pointed out that he's the first president since george washington to be reelected with fewer popular votes than he was in the first term and say he's got no mandate. michael, true? >> uh, it's hard to see the mandate of a campaign that seemed to be focused almost entirely on whether or not the republicans were going to break into your home and steal your feminine hygiene products. so i can't really say he ran on this plan to do x, he's going to get it. but i don't think that means he's a lame duck. he has the power of the presidency, it's a very powerful tool. he's got the media, obviously, very cooperative. so let's just say he's a limping duck might be a better answer. megyn: is -- julie, your thoughts. because the point of the editorial is they say he was limping along already and that generally in the second terms presidents don't, you know, their power
from his hometown of chicago. meanwhile, governor romney will be monitoring results from boston. word just in on the associated press that he and his wife have just cast their ballots in belmont, mass. some economic news on this election day. real estate data provider breeding this morning that a measure of u.s. prices rose 5% in september compared to one year ago. it is the largest year-over-year increase recorded since july to thousand six. they also said prices declined 0.3% in september from august, the first drop after six straight increases but it indicates the end of the summer buying. freddie mac posted an increase for the july-september quarter and requested no additional federal aid. it was their second straight profitable quarter. compared to a loss of $6 billion for the same quarter of 2011. big to be the gain to an increase in home prices and a decline in mortgage delinquencies. both are signs of a modest housing recovery. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. [video clip] >> i like the balanced approach to the washington journal and i like to hear the c
. mitt romney of course give a concession speech last night in boston. years a portion. [video clip] >> i believe in america. i believe in the people of america. [applause] and i ran for office because i am concerned about america. this election is over, but our principles and door. i believe that the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurging economy and renew greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field, we have given our all to this campaign. [applause] i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction, but the nation chose another leader. so ann and i join with you to pray for him in leading this country. you guys are the best. thank you so much. a thank you. thank you, guys. host: and as we continue to take your calls on c-span this morning we will go to henry on our line for democrats in michigan. good morning to you. caller: good morning. you know, this is a glorious morning. and i feel really sorry for the lady in florida. and that guy in new jersey who of just
in pennsylvania. and then another republican from texas also lost his seat. this is an ap story out of boston were the brahney/ryan campaign ended up last night. it says paul ryan will return to the house and resumed his role as budget committee chairman. we want to get your reaction to election 2012. our first call is from barbara in hudson, florida. you are calling on the independent line. for whom did you vote? caller: i voted for obama. at women's rights is a very big thing for me. also, medicare, been age 41 and disabled and also a rape victim -- a rape survivor, i should say. i believe obama has the best thing. i was going for mitt romney at first, but when he brought up the issue is about women's rights, and also with medicare and making a voucher program, and also social security, that is where i went toward obama this year. host: that was barbara in hudson, florida. next is mark from brownsville, texas on the republican line. you are on c-span. of what is your reaction to yesterday's election? disappointed in the way the election happen. i voted for mr. romney. i feel that because of the
with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. dr. fred barnes, the executive editor of the weekly standard will take your questions about the election. we will discuss the vote with the national association of latino elected and appointed officials. and the washington bureau chief with the loss angeles times will look at demographic changes in the electorate. live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. congress returns to washington d.c. next week for a lam
kind of, you know, making that commute to boston area and moving from out of state in might have something to do with that swing. >> sure it does. brian, thanks very much. we'll watch new hampshire and the four electoral votes. >> our next battleground stop is colorado with its nine electoral votes. just like ohio, went for barack obama in 2008 after helping george w. bush win the white house in 2004. cnn's kung la is in colorado. are you getting a sense of who has the upper hand? >> reporter: well, the republicans saying they have the upper hand looking at who's actually voted, cast that vote, the republicans are leading by about 25,000 votes but that's not very much of a gap. what we're seeing here in this location i'm standing in, the early voting as you mentioned, kate, is over. but what people are doing is dropping off early ballots. they're -- these are the mail-in ballots. they can drop them off and murphy's law, no one's here but they can drive up, give their ballot to this gentleman and then he'll take the ballot and drop it in this red box. from here, these ballots then
] guest: right now with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. caller: i wanted to focus in on three things i believe the democrats as well as the republicans should do that would move lower country forward. let's start with the republicans -- our country forward. let's start with the republicans. i was there with the perspective of not being mean- spirited. we know it is not going to happen 100%. the republicans think they have good ideas in
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)